Josh Glatter joined the Firm as Senior Counsel in 2015. Throughout his career, Josh’s practice has centered upon complex civil litigation on behalf of both plaintiffs and defendants in courts nationwide in a wide array of disputes. His practice has included matters as varied as complicated private equity partnership disputes, advising clients involved in government investigations, anti-competition litigation, accounting fraud litigation, and consumer fraud class action lawsuits.

Prior to joining the Firm, Josh was a member of Osen LLC, where his practice centered on anti-money laundering issues, civil counter-terrorism lawsuits, and complex civil litigation, engaging in all phases of litigation. Josh served as a member of the plaintiffs’ trial team in Linde, et al v. Arab Bank, PLC , 04-CV-2799 (BMC) (VVP) (E.D.N.Y.), the first civil lawsuit under the federal Anti-Terrorism Act against a financial institution to ever proceed to a jury trial, which resulted in liability verdicts against the Kingdom of Jordan’s largest bank in connection with injuries to U.S. nationals and their families that resulted from 24 attacks attributable to the designated Foreign Terrorist Organization Hamas. The case has since reached a preliminary settlement. Josh also played a significant role in other threat finance lawsuits, including serving on the appellate team in Weiss v. National Westminster Bank, PLC , 768 F.3d 202 (2d. Cir. 2014), and obtaining a reversal of the trial court’s earlier grant of summary judgment to that defendant.

Before his tenure at Osen LLC, Josh practiced with other prominent firms in New York, where he gained experience in securities and consumer fraud, contract and tort disputes, and white collar criminal defense litigation. From 2000 to 2006, he was associated with Harwood Feffer LLP, where, among other matters, he played a significant role in In re Safety-Kleen Corp.-S’holders Litigation, 00-CV-736 (D.S.C.), a complex accounting manipulation class action that settled for $54.5 million.

He also served as a key member and brief writer on the Alessi v. Beracha , C.A. No. 18993-NC (Del. Ch.) litigation team that resulted in significant decisions of first impression from federal and state courts concerning pre-emption under the Securities Litigation Uniform Standards Act, and the absence of bright-line “price and structure” rules in connection with breach of fiduciary claims concerning secret merger negotiations. In addition to securities and derivative lawsuits, Josh also helped achieve successful results in consumer fraud lawsuits. Josh also has experience in defense-side representations, including representing senior officers of publicly traded companies in connection with simultaneous civil, criminal, and regulatory lawsuits and proceedings.

Josh received his law degree from the University of Pennsylvania Law School in 1994, and earned his undergraduate degree with academic distinction from the State University of New York at Binghamton University in 1991. After graduating from law school, Josh served as a law clerk for the Hon. Tina L. Brozman of the United State Bankruptcy Court for the Southern District of New York.

Josh has co-authored two articles concerning ERISA fiduciary obligations for claims administrators and has also published several online articles addressing national security issues and consumer fraud matters.

TEL: 212.880.9526
FAX: 917.591.5245
jglatter@fleischmanlawfirm.com

EDUCATION

J.D., University of Pennsylvania, 1994

B.A., S.U.N.Y. Binghamton, 1991
- academic distinction

ADMISSIONS

New York

United States District Court:
  Eastern District of New York
  Northern District of New York
  Southern District of New York

United States Court of Appeals:
  First Circuit

HONORS / AWARDS

Public Justice's Trial Lawyers of the Year
   2016

CLERKSHIP

Hon. Tina L. Brozman,
United States Bankruptcy Court,
Southern District of New York

PUBLICATIONS

When are Claims Administrators ERISA Fiduciaries?, Pension & Benefits Week
(1997), (with co-author Frederick A. Brodie)

With Proper Planning, Claims Administrators Can
Avoid Unforeseen ERISA Fiduciary Responsibility
, 5 Journal of Taxation of Employee Benefits 130 (1997), (with co-author Frederick A. Brodie)


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